Category Archives: Educational Psychology

Be Not Afraid

The Christmas Eve message at Christ the King Lutheran Church was entitled “Be not afraid”. I suspect similar sermons have been preached across the globe. This comforting message finds its ways throughout society. A search for “Be Not Afraid” pulls … Continue reading

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Know Yourself

A question I often ask of new teachers is “Do you know yourself?” This is commonly met with a quizzical and puzzled look. Yet knowing who we are, how we think, what we believe, how we respond, and how we … Continue reading

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Why horses?

Saturday morning I was able to reconnect with the Minnesota EAGALA community at Acres for Life in Chisago City. I had invited my elementary science methods class to spend a morning in a horse arena to talk about the art … Continue reading

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A way of teaching about life

I was part of a district leadership team attending a conference at Madden’s resort near Brainerd, MN in the early 90’s. Seymour Papert was the keynote speaker. Papert, the MIT creative genius behind the Logo computer language, carried all the … Continue reading

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Sharing Our Humanity in the Classroom

I sat holding my mom’s hand as she died on the morning of October 31. She lived a full 87 years and died with her family all close by. Through her modeling she taught her four boys how to love. … Continue reading

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Drawing out knowledge: What it means to be a constructivist teacher from the voices of the learner

“The single most important factor influencing learning is what the learner already knows.” David Ausubel  A constructivist learning framework is based on the idea that students come into our classrooms with pre-existing knowledge. Our task as teachers is to structure … Continue reading

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The Pedagogy of Equus, Post #3: The Experiential Nature of Learning

The Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association (EAGALA) approach to facilitating a client’s journey to greater insight into their own mental health offers a strong, clear context for the mental health professional. I recently had the pleasure of completing a … Continue reading

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A Pedagogy of Equus, Post #2: Leading with Questions

     The facilitators at last week’s EAGALA training excelled at the practice of leading through questions. To better understand the EAGALA process participants would ask questions. They were sincere questions honestly asked. What they anticipated was an answer or … Continue reading

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A Pedagogy of Equus, Post #1: Talking Through the Horse

     Last week I attended Part One of the EAGALA (Equine Assisted Growth and Learning Association) certification training. EAGALA is a form of equine assisted therapy rooted in working with clients on the ground, utilizing clean language as means … Continue reading

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I Can’t Solve the Problems of the World!

I must admit I sometimes struggle with my tendency to minimize the impact of the little that I am able to do on the world at large. I read of the Mother Theresas in the world and the selfless sacrifices … Continue reading

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